The Greek Connection

If you’re not on Academia.edu, you should be. Think of it as like Facebook for academics, with a plethora of articles, papers and other things you can download. Feel free to “follow” me on there.

Anyway, they send out a “Weekly Digest” of “Top Papers from Your Newsfeed.” Yesterday, I received one that featured this:

The Son of the Vampire

Notice who bookmarked it? Yep, the same guy who invented Renfield’s Syndrome. But I digress.

What I first assumed to be a college paper, was actually a chapter from an academic anthology dedicated to Dracula, published by Brill | Rodopi and on sale for €97,00 (seriously, guys—what the fuck?).

But back to the article. Álvaro García Marín offers a fascinating proposition for the vampire’s development in popular consciousness:

While it is widely accepted that the Serbian and Eastern European revenants that came to light in the 1730s are at the origin of the Western literary vampire, and therefore of Dracula, the critique has neglected a prior source probably more prominent in the West during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: the Greek vrykolakas.

It goes way beyond retreading Leo Allatius, François Richard or Joseph Pitton de Tournefort’s famous visit to the island of Mykonos (but they all get a look-in). Give it a read.

Notes

  1. “follow” me: http://independent.academia.edu/HoggAnthony.
  2. the same guy who invented Renfield’s Syndrome: Anthony Hogg, “Renfield’s Syndrome: It Was All a Joke,” The Vampirologist (blog), September 6, 2013, accessed March 21, 2017, https://thevampirologist.wordpress.com/2013/09/06/renfields-syndrome-it-was-all-a-joke/.
  3. a chapter from an academic anthology dedicated to Dracula: Álvaro García Marín, “‘The Son of the Vampire’: Greek Gothic, or Gothic Greece?” in Dracula and the Gothic in Literature, Pop Culture and the Arts, ed. Isabel Ermida (Leiden: Brill | Rodopi, 2015), 21–43. Accessed March 21, 2017. https://www.academia.edu/17801087/_The_Son_of_the_Vampire_Greek_Gothic_or_Gothic_Greece.
  4. “While it is widely accepted that the Serbian and Eastern European revenants”: Ibid., 21.
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