The Contents of The Cambridge Companion to Dracula

A friend and fellow vampire aficionado made the following remark on a thread about my “Upcoming Books #5” regarding The Cambridge Companion to Dracula, a collection of essays due for release on December 31: “Yes, I am interested in that one. Unfortunately I can’t find any info on the authors or articles included.”

Neither could I, so I emailed the book’s editor, Roger Luckhurst. He was kind enough to share the book’s contents, so I will now reconstruct and share them (with his permission, of course) from his response on October 5, 2017:


CONTENTS

Contributors

Note of the Text

Chronology

Introduction
ROGER LUCKHURST

PART I DRACULA IN THE GOTHIC TRADITION

1 Dracula’s Pre-History: The Advent of the Vampire
NICK GROOM

2 Dracula’s Debts to the Gothic Romance
WILLIAM HUGHES

3 Dracula and the Late Victorian Gothic Revival
ALEX WARWICK

PART II CONTEXTS

4 Dracula and the Occult
CHRISTINE FERGUSON

5 Dracula and Psychology
ROGER LUCKHURST

6 Dracula and Sexology
HEIKE BAUER

7 Dracula in the Age of Mass Migration
DAVID GLOVER

8 Dracula and the East
MATTHEW GIBSON

9 Dracula’s Blood
ANTHONY BALE

10 Dracula and Women
CAROL SENF

PART III NEW DIRECTIONS

11 Dracula Queered
XAVIER ALDANA REYES

12 Dracula and New Horror Theory
MARK BLACKLOCK

13 Transnational Draculas
KEN GELDER

PART IV ADAPTATIONS

14 Dracula on Stage
CATHERINE WYNNE

15 Dracula on Film 1931-1959
ALISON PEIRSE

16 Dracula on Film and TV, 1960 to present
STACEY ABBOTT

Guide to Further Reading

Index


Nice to see some familiar names there like:

  • William Hughes: Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis, and the Gothic (1998); Beyond Dracula: Bram Stoker’s Fiction and its Cultural Context (2000); Bram Stoker: Dracula (2008)
  • David Glover: Vampires, Mummies and Liberals: Bram Stoker and the Politics of Popular Fiction (1996)
  • Matthew Gibson: Dracula and the Eastern Question: British and French Vampire Narratives of the Nineteenth-Century Near East (2006)
  • Carol Senf: The Vampire in Nineteenth-Century English Literature (1988); The Critical Response to Bram Stoker (ed.) (1993); Dracula: Between Tradition and Modernism (1998); Science and Social Science in Bram Stoker’s Fiction (2002); Bram Stoker (2010)
  • Ken Gelder: Reading the Vampire (1994); New Vampire Cinema (2012)
  • Catherine Wynne: Bram Stoker, Dracula and the Victorian Gothic Stage (2013)
  • Alison Peirse: After Dracula: The 1930s Horror Film (2013)
  • Stacey Abbott: Reading Angel: The TV Spin-off with a Soul (ed.) (2005); Celluloid Vampires: Life After Death in the Modern World (2007); Angel (2009).

I also asked whether the essays were going to be new or or reprints. Luckhurst said: “All new, all dancing!” Good enough for me!


  1. “Yes, I am interested in that one”: Holly June Graves, “Yes, I am interested in that one,” October 4, 2017, comment on Holly June Graves, “Uh-oh, there may be a title or two on this list that I may be interested in,” https://www.facebook.com/groups/1668311286764643/permalink/1948821465380289/?comment_id=1948843385378097&reply_comment_id=1948883275374108&comment_tracking=%7B%22tn%22%3A%22R%22%7D.
  2. Alison Peirse: My actual familiarity with her work, before seeking book titles for this post, was her article “Gothic Vancouver: Blood Ties and Vampire Television,” Gothic Studies 14, no. 2 (November 2012): 89–105.
  3. “All new, all dancing!”: Roger Luckhurst, email message to author, October 10, 2017.
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